Young Jane Young Abroad

Last year, six or so weeks before #metoo, I published a book about the importance of hearing women’s stories. It has been a little over a year since Young Jane Young came out, and a lot has changed and sometimes it seems like nothing has changed. But that’s pessimism! A lot has changed. Here are some of the jackets from around the world.

 

 

 

 

Rebecca Serle at Skylight Books

9781250295187.jpgI’m in conversation with my friend and fellow writer, Rebecca Serle, on September 18th at Skylight Books. She is the best, and you should come because we will amuse you. And if you don’t come, we will amuse each other. But it’s better if you come. We are celebrating her new book—and first adult novel—The Dinner List. The Dinner List is magical and moving and on the Indie Next List for September.

Here’s the publisher’s synopsis:

At one point or another, we’ve all been asked to name five people, living or dead, with whom we’d like to have dinner. Why do we choose the people we do? And what if that dinner was to actually happen? These are the questions Rebecca Serle contends with in her utterly captivating novel, THE DINNER LIST, a story imbued with the same delightful magical realism as One Day, and the life-changing romance of Me Before You.

When Sabrina arrives at her thirtieth birthday dinner she finds at the table not just her best friend, but also three significant people from her past, and well, Audrey Hepburn. As the appetizers are served, wine poured, and dinner table conversation begins, it becomes clear that there’s a reason these six people have been gathered together.

For me, a great concept is one that makes you reflect on your own life: who would you invite, if you could invite anyone? Side note: one of my favorite mini-genres of short story is the disastrous dinner party. So many good ones. Joshua Ferris and Rebecca Lee come to mind. Would you guys read this blog if I turned it into a short story review?

By the way, it’s a writing year for me, which means I’m not doing events. Except this one! So, if you want to see my face and you live near Los Angeles, this is your only chance.

Event date: 
Tuesday, September 18, 2018 – 7:30pm
Event address: 
Skylight Books
1818 N Vermont Ave
Los AngelesCA 90027

https://www.skylightbooks.com/event/rebecca-serle-discusses-her-new-novel-dinner-list-gabrielle-zevin

Texts with Friends: Tauntauns, Ton-Tons, and The Killing Jar

My friend Jenn has a book out today, and we texted about it.

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Jenn’s new book, The Killing Jar, is out today, and I will be going to her LA book launch at The Last Bookstore this Saturday, if you want to hang out with us.

Notes

1) There is a Ton-Ton on the Jordanian version of Sesame Street (and not the Japanese one). He is the mustard colored one below.

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2) Also, this is my bitmoji:

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Book Recommendations for You

A.J. Fikry does refer to blurbs as the “blood diamonds of publishing,” but nonetheless, here are a few books I’ve enjoyed (and blurbed!) over the past several months.

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My blurb: “The first rule of Dietland is you should definitely talk about Dietland. And I suspect you’ll want to. Gather your book clubs, gather all the Jennifers you know! At first you’ll think you’re reading a familiar story: a woman who works at a women’s magazine tries to lose weight. And then POW! Dietland  lithely moves in ways and to places you won’t expect. Sarai Walker has a wonderfully curious mind, and this is an impressive, ambitious first novel.”

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My blurb: “The Travels of Daniel Ascher is about the power of stories, particularly the ones we tell about ourselves. Within its svelte form, the novel packs in a love story (several actually), a family story, a war story, a mystery, a travelogue, and even a convincingly imagined children’s adventure series. All these strands weave together beautifully in this deftly plotted and deeply moving novel.”

Readers who enjoyed A.J. Fikry will very much respond to this one.

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My blurb: “SAINT MAZIE is a novel with as much style and moxie as its titular character. I missed Mazie Gordon-Phillips and her family when I was finished reading, but I missed New York, too. By telling this one woman’s story, Jami Attenberg has managed to write an ode to New Yorkers of every generation. She is a true poet of the city.”

I loved Jami Attenberg’s The Middlesteins, too.

For Young Adults:

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THE GAME OF LOVE AND DEATH is a unique love story, and yet, it is also the love story of all humans through time. Martha Brockenbrough is a compassionate observer of many worlds—airfields, jazz clubs, baseball diamonds, newspapers, and Hoovervilles to name a few—and the beautiful, doomed human types that dwell in them. This is an exceptional novel.”

This book is indicated for young adults, but I’m confident adults will enjoy it.

Win’s Acronym & a Few Notes on My Book Tour

Win’s Acronym & a Few Notes on My Book Tour

I’ve been on book tour for The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry and indeed, I’m still on book tour! Come see me at an event if you have an evening.

Many amazing things have happened to me on this book tour, and when I have a moment to catch my breath, I plan to write about a few of them. I think of the many babies in baskets I have encountered (and the one cat in a basket), the spectacular islands of Washington, the Fikry-reading Sasquatch in Anacortes, etc., etc. I have bought more books than I will be able to read in my lifetime, been stuffed with pie, lefse, cupcakes, Orca-shaped cookies, and love, seen numerous friends, chatted with booksellers of every taste and constitution (quite a few A.J. Fikrys, as is probably to be expected), met readers ranging in age from toddlers to 80+,  and yes, visited twenty or thirty bookstores, each delightful in her own way. (I do not know that I will ever tire of visiting a new bookstore.) And the tour is not quite half finished!

However, the reason I write you tonight is because of an event I did earlier this week at Books Inc. in Alameda, CA. A reader handed me a letter along with a bar of admirably dark chocolate. The letter concerns the Anya Balanchine books, and it answers a question that many of you have been asking me for months (and that I have promised to answer for months): namely, what DOES Win’s acronym mean in In the Age of Love and Chocolate? She was VERY close — all but three words. My corrections are in black ink. 

Interview with me about A.J. Fikry on NPR’s All Things Considered

Audie Cornish interviewed me about The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry for All Things Considered. She is simply a wonderful interviewer and she (and her producer Justine Kenin) could not have been kinder to me or the book. Also over at NPR, they’re asking people to name the three books that define them. You can tweet or tumblr it, using #my3books. Mine are Charlotte’s WebThen We Came to the End, and Song of Solomon. But really, if you asked me on a different day, you’d probably get a different answer.

http://www.npr.org/2014/03/28/294393870/in-storied-life-characters-come-with-a-reading-list