Category Archives: Press

Interview with me about A.J. Fikry on NPR’s All Things Considered

Audie Cornish interviewed me about The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry for All Things Considered. She is simply a wonderful interviewer and she (and her producer Justine Kenin) could not have been kinder to me or the book. Also over at NPR, they’re asking people to name the three books that define them. You can tweet or tumblr it, using #my3books. Mine are Charlotte’s WebThen We Came to the End, and Song of Solomon. But really, if you asked me on a different day, you’d probably get a different answer.

http://www.npr.org/2014/03/28/294393870/in-storied-life-characters-come-with-a-reading-list

 

An Interview about In the Age of Love and Chocolate over at YA Romantics

http://jenryland.blogspot.com/2013/08/authors-are-rock-stars-gabrielle-zevin.html

intheageofloveandchocoalte

It’s my favorite blog interview I’ve given in a while not to mention the only blog interview I’ve done about In the Age of Love and Chocolate.  The interview also answers many of the questions readers have been e-mailing me about the book.  And if that isn’t enough, there’s still time for you to win *signed* hardcover copies of All These Things I’ve Done and Because It Is My Blood.

because it is my blood us hc

An excerpt from the interview below:

Jen:

I’m so excited (and a little sad) that In the Age of Love and Chocolate, the final book in your fantastic Birthright trilogy, is coming out in October 2013. Did the book have a title change, because I’ve also seen it listed as In the Days of Death and Chocolate.

Gabrielle: 

Thank you, and I’m so glad you like the series. The truth about the title change is that I wrote two entirely different books for the last book. The first time I wrote the book it was called In the Days of Death and ChocolateThat version was pretty deep into the publishing process when I began to have a recurring, waking dream about Anya Balanchine. I kept having this fear that I would run into her and that she was mad at me. At first I tried to ignore her, but after a while, I couldn’t. I was at a party, and I actually thought I saw her across the room! That was a Saturday. On Sunday, I called my editor and I might have cried a little bit and I asked her if I could write the book again. She said yes, and now Anya Balanchine isn’t angry with me anymore…

Find the rest at Jen Ryland/YA Romantics.

Link

One of my very favorite book people says nice things about BECAUSE IT IS MY BLOOD in the Atlantic Wire

Northington sums it up: “Future New York mafia! Anya is the bad-assest heroine I’ve met in a while—on her way to being a psychopath, but a really compelling psychopath.” Godfather fans, this is your Y.A

I asked my publisher if we could put “bad-assest” on the cover.

Tuesday Hijinks, No. 4:  An interview with me about the paperback version of All These Things I’ve Done and title reveal for the second book.

Something I wanted to put in the interview but didn’t. All the titles of the books in the series add up to form a synopsis of the series. At this point, you have half the sentence: All these things I’ve done because it is my blood… etc. 

P.S. The jacket on my tumblr is – I believe – the final version; it’s a little bit different than the one on BookPage.

Wednesday Narcissism #2

A comprehensive and very smart review of All These Things I’ve Done over at Teenreads:

Gabrielle Zevin is both versatile and talented. From writing the screenplay to the wickedly clever Conversations with Other Women to penning a novel (ELSEWHERE) whose conception of the afterlife beats THE LOVELY BONES in my book, she’s proven again and again that she can tell compelling, honest stories that will appeal to thoughtful audiences. Most of all, Zevin excels at two things: social satire (as in her novel for adults, THE HOLE WE’RE IN) and love stories (including one of my all-time favorites, MEMOIRS OF A TEENAGE AMNESIAC). Now, Zevin brings together these two particular strengths in ALL THESE THINGS I’VE DONE, the first volume in a projected trilogy.

It also has a passage that include my editor’s (and maybe my) favorite quote from the book:

Anya’s deliberately stoic demeanor gradually breaks down, just as her world does, and she finds herself experiencing raw emotions —- not just toward Win but also toward her siblings and grandmother —- that she never would have acknowledged before: “I felt light-headed and breathless and like I might throw up. My chest was tight and I wanted to punch the wall. I realized that this was love, and it was awful.”

I kind of want to go friend the reviewer Norah Piehl on Facebook or somewhere, but I worry she’ll stop reviewing my books.